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➳ Incidents of Travel in Yucatan Read ➻ Author John Lloyd Stephens – Eiyo.us

Incidents of Travel in YucatanIncludes The Original Frederick Catherwood Line Drawn Illustrations.John Lloyd Stephens Was An American Explorer Who Documented His Travels To Egypt, The Middle East, Greece, Central America, And Other Places This Book, Along With Volume II, Captures His Journeys Throught The Mayan Yucat N, Where Many Famous Ruins Had Yet To Be Discovered Along With Artist, Frederick Catherwood, This Best Seller Brought The Mysteries Of The Of The Mayan World To Light Through His Detailed Descriptions Of His Travels Through What Many Thought Was Worthless Jungles The Two Of Them Discovered The Ruins Of Palenque, Uxmal, Chich N Itz , Kabah, Sayil And Many Other Cities Buried Under The Tropical Vegetation Of The Region.

    10 thoughts on “➳ Incidents of Travel in Yucatan Read ➻ Author John Lloyd Stephens – Eiyo.us


  1. says:

    It takes a lot for me to give a book five stars I d give this one six, if I could First, however, let me state that this book isn t for everyone I read it because, as a student of Maya history for 25 years, it s required I should have read it sooner It s the true story of two men who traveled through the Maya world in 1840 and brought their information back to the masses I believe that we care today because of the passion they had for the ruins all those years ago.After visiting some of the places John Lloyd Stephens writes about, I can honestly say that this book after 150 years is still relevant today Stephens easy style, his adventurous spirit, and his friendship with Frederick Catherwood the artist who traveled with him all made this an extraordinary read His excitement at seeing the ruins for the first time, his way of describing them without judgment is something all of us strive for in the archaeology field Okay, so his crazy passion for crawling down inside volcanoes was a bit odd As was his adoration of his macho , his mule But when he described a thunderstorm one night the flashes of light illuminating the ruins around him I could see it I was there It s one hundred and fifty years later, and I was right there with him.At one ...


  2. says:

    This book and vol 2 is a classic of its type the Victorian travel account Stephens was in fact the American ambassador to Central America But because the region was convulsed by revolution he spent a lot of time traveling around in search of someone to submit his credentials to And, for want of any official duties, he was able to indulge his mania for Mayan ruins British artist Frederick Catherwood traveled with him and captured some of the most iconic images we have of Mayan bas reliefs It is these volumes that convinced archaeologists that the Maya were their own culture, and not Egyptians or something.I find the exploring ruins bits far fascinating than his tedious treks through the countryside, dodging revolutionaries, looking for food or shelter, or eying local maidens And I am not alone in this there are greatest hits editions of these books made up of only the archaeological sections It is also frantically un PC, and if it bothe...


  3. says:

    For me this was a difficult read Read just like the unedited, free flow journal that it is Perhaps could serve as the basis for a story about the Yucatan, but as a stand alone it did not serve that purpose for me Just too confusing, poorly constructed, sometimes not particularly coherent.


  4. says:

    John Stevens and Frederick Catherwood s travels in the Maya lands became famous as soon as they were published in the mid 1850s These travel stories intrigued readers with their detailed descriptions of exotic landscapes and enigmatic people Stevens US was the writer and Catherwood Great Britan the illustrator Together they created books of enduring fascination and brought ancient Maya culture to the attention of the world This spurred an onslaught of adventurers and explorers who wanted to find ruined cities in tropical jungles, and endure the grueling primitive conditions of travel in undeveloped areas of Mexico and Central America Stevens writes with wry humor and picturesque detail, capturing innumerable crusty and sinister characters while encountering unexpected kindnesses Catherwood s drawings are charming and mysterious the first...


  5. says:

    I have always wanted to read John Lloyd Stephens account of his travels through Central America with artist Frederick Catherwood, whose drawings of the Mayan ruins they rediscovered and documented have become iconic This book is sort of a sequel to Stephens and Catherwood s first book, which covered territory That expedition was cut short when Catherwood became ill with malaria while investigating the ancient Mayan city of Uxmal In this book they return to Uxmal, setting up camp once again inside the ruins But it isn t quite what I expected Howard Carter s mesmerizing three volume account of the discovery and opening of the tomb of Tutankhamen has become my touchstone I guess Sure, Carter had great material to work with, but so does Stephens, and yet ther...


  6. says:

    This is travel, the old way I recommend this book for the modern traveler who is serious about chronicling his adventures While the methods are old, the author s techniques are easily adapted to our modern times with a camera and journal This is for the traveler who takes the time to meet the people, as opposed to rushing through a series of exhibits and or cultural sites Of course this is really only possible when one has the luxury of time I expect to chro...


  7. says:

    Definitely of a great read when in the Yucatan I was not in the Yucatan, however, at the time of reading this classic tale of intrepid Victorian travellers, nor have I ever been in the the Yucatan And yes, the account is subjective to 19th century expectations, yet has that Indiana Jones feel about it, funnily enough, I can t locate online any of the original daguerreotypes that the explorers took of their travels But this suite of books ...


  8. says:

    I had the good fortune to visit Uxmal and Palenque in 2015 and Quirigua and Copan in January of 2017 all are sites visited by Stephens and his artist companion Frederick Catherwood in the 1830s This book is highly recommended by the Maya archaeologist who conducted the tours Stephens has a very unadorned style of writing which no doubt explains the popularity of the book since 1841 I have been told that it was second only to the Bible in sales when first published and I can certainly understand the romance of lost cities and vanished civilizations for the American public in the 19th century and right to the present Stephens has a very sensible approach to the ruins and his point of view has been substantiated by subsequent scholars Although he could not read the glyphs he was correct when he stated that likely they were accounts of the history of the people who carved them He also was correct when he surmised that the buildings and sculptures were created by the people in the region and owed nothing to the Chinese, Egyptians or East Indians He also observed that the decay was likely to be caused by environmental factors than remote antiquity At one point he observes the close physical resemblance between a Maya he encounters and the carved face on a relief Anyone who reads this must stand in awe of the physical stamina of both men as they confront heat, torrential rainfall, mountainous terrain and above...


  9. says:

    I first read this book back in 1975 prior to my first visit to Mexico While it is not so good as the same author s Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan, John Lloyd Stephens still maintains his keen sense of observation and excellent judgment He knew a hundred years early that the Maya built their own pyramids and had a written language that went well beyond mere calendrical observations Most of this volume is taken up with Stephens and Catherwood in Merida, the capital of Yucatan, followed by the Maya ruins at Uxmal in the Puuc Hills Poss...


  10. says:

    BOOKS ABOUT YUCAT N The best book of any kind about the Yucat n Peninsula, and it s than 150 years old This is the book that made the Maya ruins of the region famous to the world John Lloyd Stephens, a lawyer who found fame as a writer, wrote a series of travel books, including two about his travels in Central America and Mexico I think his earlier volume, Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucat n, is superior to this later volume, but both are probably the most perfect travelogues ever written, filled wit...

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